Easton EMS celebrates 70th anniversary

EMT Cristina DiPalma greets Easton residents during the EMS open house.

EMT Cristina DiPalma greets Easton residents during the EMS open house.

The Easton Volunteer Emergency Medical Service marked its 70th anniversary by holding an open house.

The event included an award presented by the State of Connecticut, a demonstration of hands- only CPR, a chance for the public to meet search-and-rescue dogs and a cake reception.

Cristina DiPalma, an emergency medical technician since December, greeted people outdoors during the event.

“We are trying to show the community what exactly the EMS has to offer,” DiPalma said. “I know that a lot of people don’t feel comfortable calling EMS for an emergency and are just curious about what’s in the building. This is an opportunity for the community to see what’s inside.”

Carolyn Kearney, EMS chief, accepted an award for the service for the HeartSafe Community Program. The award was presented by Michele Connelly, HeartSafe coordinator for the Department of Public Health Office of Emergency Services. Easton EMS exceeded the required number of Automatic External Defibrillator devices in town.

“This is our 70th year of Easton EMS, of neighbors helping neighbors when they are in distress,” Kearney said.

Easton EMS Commissioner Gloria Bindelglass talks about AED devices with the open house guests. — Tina Ugas photo.

Easton EMS Commissioner Gloria Bindelglass talks about AED devices with the open house guests. — Tina Ugas photo.

EMS Commissioner Gloria Bindelglass hosted the hands-only CPR, which is CPR without mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. Bindelglass showed the guests how to correctly perform CPR and apply an AED device on someone who is not breathing.

According to Bindelglass, there are three stages to hands-only CPR. First, gently shake the person to see if they are conscience; if there is no movement or signs of breathing, have someone call 911. Second, ask someone to get an AED, and finally, start the hands-on CPR.

She said expose the chest, find the line between the two nipples, put hands between the nipples and press down two inches, hard and fast, 120 times a minute.

“If you hear the song ‘Staying Alive’ in your head, you’ll know the right beat to go, and that will be perfect,” Bindelglass said. “If you sing the song in your head, it will calm you down, and you’ll be at the right rate for compressions.”

One of the other emergency medical technicians suggested the Imperial March from the movie Star Wars, in the case of Star Wars fans. He said it has a rhythm of 120 beats per minute and played the song.

Several people tried the hands-only CPR and AED device. Bindelglass said she also created videos showing the proper technique for hands-only CPR, AED training, and combining both during an emergency. The videos are on the Facebook page called CARMA for Life. She said the videos are being aired weekly.

The first video is of AED training, the second video of hands-only CPR and the third video shows combining the two techniques. Bindelglass created the videos with her son Scott, who learned CPR as a student at Joel Barlow High School. He wanted to teach other people.

David Allen and his daughter Sarah attended the open house to learn about EMS techniques. — Tina Ugas photo.

David Allen and his daughter Sarah attended the open house to learn about EMS techniques. — Tina Ugas photo.

David Allen and his daughter Sarah attended the event. Allen trained on the hands-only CPR and Sarah got to meet the rescue dogs.

“I learned about the search and rescue dogs and how when they are being used to rescue anyone they are treated like regular dogs,” Sarah said. Her father commented on the hands-only CPR and the EMS.

“Happy 70th Anniversary to Easton EMS, “Allen said. “It was great to do hands-on with Gloria and to be reminded how to do CPR.”

Along with CPR and AED training, rescue dogs from Resources in Search and Rescue were at the open house. The dogs assist in International Police Working Dog Association certified teams for air, scent, trailing, heat recovery dehumidification, and water recovery.

Cathy Kohut, owner of rescue dog, Prudence, thanked the Easton EMS for their work with them and the community.

“We are honored to be here for the 70th Anniversary,” Kohut said. “They are remarkable people, and they are an incredible service to the town of Easton. We work with EMS periodically at search and research and value all the volunteer EMS people, especially in our local town.”

Easton EMS was named a Connecticut HeartSafe community group for exceeding the required number of automatic external defibrillators in town. — Steven Krauchick photo

Easton EMS was named a Connecticut HeartSafe community group for exceeding the required number of automatic external defibrillators in town. — Steven Krauchick photo

By participating in the comments section of this site you are agreeing to our Privacy Policy and User Agreement

© HAN Network. All rights reserved. The Easton Courier, 16 Bailey Ave, Ridgefield, CT 06877

Designed by WPSHOWER

Powered by WordPress